Canterbury tales winner

It is the Innkeeper who comes up with the idea to offer a prize. There are 29 people in the group, not including the narrator and the innkeeper.

Canterbury tales winner

He cites Christ and Plato as support for his argument that it is best to speak plainly and tell the truth rather than to lie. He then returns to his story of the first night he spent with the group of pilgrims.

After serving the pilgrims a banquet and settling the bill with them, the Host of the tavern speaks to the group. He welcomes and compliments the company, telling them they are the merriest group of pilgrims to pass through his inn all year.

He adds that he would like to contribute to their happiness, free of charge. He says that he is sure they will be telling stories as they travel, since it would be boring to travel in silence.

Therefore, he proposes to invent some entertainment for them if they will unanimously agree to do as he says. The Host congratulates the group on its good decision.

He lays out his plan: Whomever the Host decides has told the most meaningful and comforting stories will receive a meal paid for by the rest of the pilgrims upon their return.

The Host also declares that he will ride with the pilgrims and serve as their guide at his own cost. If anyone disputes his judgment, he says, that person must pay for the expenses of the pilgrimage. The company agrees and makes the Host its governor, judge, and record keeper.

They settle on a price for the supper prize and return to drinking wine. The next morning, the Host wakes everyone up and gathers the pilgrims together. After they have set off, he reminds the group of the agreement they made. He also reminds them that whoever disagrees with him must pay for everything spent along the way.

He tells the group members to draw straws to decide who tells the first tale. The Knight wins and prepares to begin his tale. Analysis The Host shows himself to be a shrewd businessman.

Equally quickly, he changes the focus of the pilgrimage. In the opening lines of the General Prologue, the narrator says that people go on pilgrimages to thank the martyr, who has helped them when they were in need 17— He sees the pilgrimage as an economic transaction: Instead of traveling to reach a destination the shrine of Saint Thomas Becketthe traveling becomes a contest, and the pilgrimage becomes about the journey itself rather than the destination.

Bailey also stands to profit from the contest: After creating the storytelling contest, Bailey quickly appoints himself its judge.Winner of a Poet Laureate Award Nomination from UCLA and CAL, The Brubury Tales has also won Reader Views Reviewers Choice Award for Poetry Book of the Year and the Bookhitch Award for the Most Innovative Book of Poetry.

A summary of The Knight’s Tale, Parts 3–4 in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Canterbury Tales and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

Canterbury tales winner

Winner Blurb: The nine bawdy tales of Chaucer's Canterbury pilgrims are tamed and retold in modern English and graphic novel format with bits of the original language included in the borders, decorated in the manner of medieval manuscripts. The Canterbury Tales What will the winner of the contest receive upon returning to Canterbury?

Canterbury - Wikipedia

Horse Money Meal Statue5/5(3). A summary of General Prologue: Conclusion in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales.

Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Canterbury Tales and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. Mário de Sá-Carneiro: Poet: Dispersão: May Apr Raphael Saadiq: Musician: Tony!

Toni! Tone! MayMikhail Saakashvili: Head of State.

Comparison of “The Decameron” and “The Canterbury Tales” : Common Themes in Boccaccio and Chaucer